4 Traditional African Hairstyles That Are Back In Vogue

1. Threaded Hair

Courtesy: Melanmag

Long before heat styling, came the technique of hair threading. This traditional West African technique has been used for centuries as a protective style and women have rocked it beautifully. For this hairstyle, black thread is wrapped tightly around the strands of hair from the roots all the way to the tips. Did you know that this sleek hairstyle can also help with retaining your length? Yep! And it’s super easy to maintain too. Diligent moisturizing your threaded hair with a good leave in conditioner like, ProfectiV Mega Growth Daily Leave-In Conditioner, can help you maintain this threaded hairstyle.

2. Coily Bantu Knots

Courtesy: Pinterest

Aren’t they super edgy? Bantu knots are also known as Zulu knots because the Zulu people, a Bantu ethnic group, were the first to wear this style. If you’re on the lookout for a great protective hairstyle, we urge you to these beauts. All you need is a rat tail comb, a few elastic bands and good sectioning skills. You can pattern your way through while at it as well. Try our 6 Easy Steps To Bantu Knots to know the exact step by step process.

3. Fulani Braids

Courtesy: Pinterest

And finally the Funali Braids! These have been the traditional African go-to hairstyle and have clearly evolved over centuries. We sure loving the comeback that the vibrant beaded Fulani braids have made. These stunners are named after the Fulani group and were traditionally used as a bridal hairstyle. The colourful beads and cowries served as accessories for the bride’s braids. But today, Fulani braids are a great option for those who want to rock their braids with some beaded sass! We say flaunt these braids in full confidence.

4. Amasunzu

Courtesy: Refinery29

The Amasunzu may have become an overnight sensation when Lupita rocked this look for the Oscars, but this was not an overnight invention. The Amasunzu was traditionally worn by Rwandan men and unmarried women. This crescent-shaped hairdo was an indication of social status and signalled the age for marriage. We think this is a great style to work with your natural hair.

Do you know all about washing your braids? Check out https://www.blackhairhub.com/how-to-wash-african-american-braids/

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